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Long before 9/11, Osama bin Laden’s terrorist activities around the world were being cited as a classic case of “blowback.” Quite obviously, the CIA’s support for bin Laden, Ayman al-Zawahiri, and other radical Islamists in Afghanistan in the 1980s, ostensibly to counter the Soviets, had indeed helped spawn a virulently anti-American global terror network that was returning to haunt us.

terrorism - PalestineTuly Wultz and his 16-year-old son Daniel were enjoying a Passover holiday dinner at a Tel Aviv restaurant when the suicide bomber struck. Nine diners were killed in the grisly attack that day in April 2006 and dozens more were wounded, including the Wultzes, Americans from Florida who were visiting Israel on vacation. Daniel, who was the more severely injured of the two, lost his spleen, a kidney, and a leg in the blast. Despite the heroic efforts of doctors, he died a month later in an Israeli hospital. Because Daniel Wultz was an American, the terror attack that claimed his life received more attention in the U.S. media than the “typical” suicide bombings that have become all too familiar in Israel, Iraq, Pakistan, and many other parts of the world.

The U.S. Agency for International Development shuns the use of DDT to fight malaria in African countries, favoring bednets to control mosquitoes. Yet nets are rarely distributed and are largely ineffective.

 

When the New World Order architects at the Council on Foreign Relations prattle about sovereignty, they mean something entirely different from independent nation-states.

Constitutionalists are challenging UN entanglements and the call to war. Some false conservatives are denouncing this principled stand as unpatriotic, even treasonous.

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