Citing his pro-life beliefs, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, a Republican, became the latest political leader to slam the current “war on drugs” as a “failure.” Instead of putting illegal-drug users in prison, first-time non-violent offenders should be sentenced to mandatory treatment and rehabilitation programs, the GOP governor argued during a speech at the Brookings Institution this week.   

The remarks came in the wake of a new law in New Jersey seeking to reform some elements of the state’s dealings with addicts and narcotics users. Passed overwhelmingly by the legislature last month but criticized by Gov. Christie for its “piecemeal” approach, the measure creates a pilot program ordering certain people caught with drugs into a year-long treatment regime instead of imposing criminal penalties.  

"The war on drugs, while well-intentioned, has been a failure," Gov. Christie argued in his speech.

On Monday Texas Gov. Rick Perry became the sixth Governor to refuse to implement ObamaCare's state exchanges or Medicaid expansion.

Dr. Richard Pan’s bill, AB 2019, to require a doctor to "sign off" on parents' decisions not to inoculate their children will wind up enforcing that inoculation. During a public hearing, Dawn Richardson, Director of Advocacy for the National Vaccination Information Center (NVIC), showed up to explain why she and her organization opposed the bill.

Texas Governor Rick Perry has joined the ranks of other GOP governors eager to assert the sovereignty of their states by nullifying the ObamaCare law. Perry announced on Monday that he will not be expanding the Medicaid program or creating the necessary healthcare exchange to implement the president's signature legislation. As noted by Reuters, “The announcement makes Texas the most populous state that has rejected the provisions.”

In anticipation that the Supreme Court might rule in favor of ObamaCare, Avik Roy wrote in Forbes magazine that Health Savings Plans (HSAs) would be negatively impacted and possibly forced out of existence.

HSAs were first allowed under law as part of President George W. Bush’s prescription drug program passed in 2003. At the time it seemed a common sense answer to a sticky problem: over usage of health insurance benefits and the consequent rising costs to pay for that over usage.