From 1993 until midway through 2011, Newt Gingrich repeatedly and quite forcefully argued that the federal government ought to impose an ObamaCare-like individual mandate on Americans, requiring them to have health insurance or otherwise to demonstrate that they can pay their future healthcare bills. (Regular readers of The New American are well aware of this because this publication has covered the story extensively.) However, a recently unearthed recording of a 2009 conference call featuring the former Speaker of the House is getting quite a bit of attention in the blogosphere because it suggests to some that Gingrich explicitly endorsed the healthcare legislation then beginning its trek through the legislative process.

Five percent of Americans are severely mentally ill, a new report from the federal government says, while about 20 percent suffer some sort of mental illness annually.

President Obama, along with the Democratic-led Senate and formerly Democratic-led House, touted the 2010 healthcare overhaul as a landmark law that would curb the rise in U.S. healthcare costs. However, according to a new report released last week by the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), reform programs akin to those endorsed by ObamaCare have neither abated healthcare costs nor salvaged any significant amount of government revenue.

Last year, the Transportation Security Administration reneged on a promise to conduct further studies into the safety of the radiation-firing body scanners used at airports nationwide. Now that there have been reports of cancer clusters among TSA agents at the Boston Logan International Airport, however, the TSA is obligated to test the operators of the naked-body scanners for radiation exposure. However, the TSA still refuses to test the actual machines.

Since the passage of the Affordable Care Act, more than 1,200 companies have been accorded waivers from the healthcare reform law, the Health and Human Services Department (HHS) disclosed Friday, the final day that the agency is required to report the data.