Think ObamaCare, with its thousands of pages of rules and regulations governing every aspect of American life, is revolutionary? Think again, says the Los Angeles Times. When it comes to healthcare, writes Noam N. Levey, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney “has embraced a strategy that in crucial ways is more revolutionary — and potentially more disruptive — than the law Obama signed two years ago.”

“I think the Affordable Care Act is the single least popular piece of major domestic legislation in the last 70 years. It was not popular when it passed; it’s less popular now. I think the worst thing that could happen to Barack Obama’s reelection campaign would be if he had to spend four months this fall explaining what ObamaCare 2 would look like.”

Passing ObamaCare was a “mistake,” retiring Rep. Barney Frank (D-Mass.) told New York magazine in the course of a wide-ranging interview. President Barack Obama, apparently believing his own campaign hype — an easy thing to do given the adulation heaped upon him by the mainstream media — thought he had a public mandate to enact an overhaul of the healthcare system.

The University of New South Wales in Australia has published the results of a study of 1,200 women who were 60 years or older. What were the findings? Women who have children live longer than women who do not have children. Even more salient, the more children that women have, the longer their life expectancy. Women who had at least six children were 40 percent less likely to die during the follow-up period of the survey.

One of the big selling points of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), better known as ObamaCare, was that despite its massive new spending initiatives it would somehow reduce the federal deficit. But a new study by Medicare trustee Charles Blahous finds that absent repeal of major provisions of ObamaCare, the law could add as much as $527 billion to the deficit over the next decade.