When President Obama, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid saw to the passage of ObamaCare in March 2010, they feigned excitement over the supposed benefits that were to befall the American people. As time passed following the law’s passage, however, it became evident that the law was not all it was touted to be, and a massive amount of waivers were handed out to those well-connected enough to secure them from the Obama administration. The latest group to receive a waiver is a company that was ironically one of the biggest cheerleaders of the healthcare legislation at the time of its passage: the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP).

Vermont state houseSen. Bernard Sanders was obviously correct when he stated recently that the citizens of his home state of Vermont believe healthcare is a right. At least enough of them believe it to convince their state legislature and governor to make socialized medicine the law of the land.

During April, the Obama Administration approved 208 waivers for its socialist health-care mandates. Funny thing is, The Daily Caller reports, the administration gave 38 of them, or 20 percent, to businesses or other entities in the district of leftist Democrat Nancy Pelosi (left). As Speaker of the House, Pelosi was the loudest cheerleader of all for health-care mandates that her own constituents now flee — apparently with her approval.

In a move that  surprised most establishment conservatives, Republican Presidential Primary Candidate Newt Gingrich announced on Sunday his support for the individual healthcare mandate, which is a central aspect of federal universal healthcare legislation (ObamaCare).

Rand PaulThe fundamental premise of universal healthcare, be it a Canadian-style government-run system or an ObamaCare-like public-private insurance scheme, is that individuals have a right to healthcare. That assumption, said Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), is akin to a belief in slavery. Paul made that assertion during the course of a May 11 hearing of the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Subcommittee on Primary Health and Aging, the subject of which was using community health centers to reduce emergency room use for non-emergencies.