On Wednesday, October 13, United States authorities announced the biggest fraudulent enterprise in Medicare history. A group of Armenian gangsters set up “phantom” healthcare clinics, as well as a variety of other measures, with the intent to cheat Medicare out of $163 million. Thus far, 73 associates have been indicted, 53 have been arrested, and seven suspects remain on the run.

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, also known as ObamaCare, mandates that insurance companies cover a variety of preventive services at no out-of-pocket cost, thanks to an amendment sponsored by Sen. Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.).

Scranton, Pennsylvania, the hometown of Vice President Joe Biden, has become the hometown of the latest ObamaCare controversy. Jeffrey Lord, writing for the American Spectator, reports that the impending closure of three Catholic hospitals in the Scranton area, almost certainly in part because of the new healthcare legislation, is threatening to become a major public-relations debacle for the Obama administration and a major drag on the electoral prospects for three Democratic congressional candidates.

Susan Reverby, Wellesley College (MA) Professor of Women’s Studies, has unearthed evidence of a study conducted in Guatemala by the U.S. government between 1946-48 in which Guatemalan subjects were deliberately inoculated with sexually-transmitted diseases (STDs). More than 60 years ago, government medical researchers intentionally infected hundreds of Guatemalans with gonorrhea and syphilis, including prisoners and institutionalized mental patients, without their permission or even knowledge. Reverby posted her report on her website.

Anyone who was confused as to why big insurance companies would support such an obviously anti-market piece of legislation as ObamaCare — a law supposedly designed to protect consumers from greedy, heartless insurers — need look no further than a September 30 New York Times report. Reed Abelson writes that the Principal Financial Group, which offers employer-based health insurance to about 840,000 people, “announced on Thursday that it planned to stop selling health insurance, another sign of upheaval emerging among insurers as the new federal health law starts to take effect.”