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Dr. GruberThe push for President Obama's agenda to promote healthcare “reform” is being secretly underwritten by taxpayer dollars. MIT economist Jonathan Gruber, described by the Washington Post's Ezra Klein as “probably been the most aggressive academic economist supporting the reform effort,” has been on the U.S. Health and Human Services Department payroll to the tune of $392,600 over the past year.

abortion fetusThe American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology (AJOG) published online in September 2009 a pro-abortion article entitled: “An ethically justified practical approach to offering, recommending, performing, and referring for induced abortion and feticide.”

The New York Times documented that several "progressive" states that have expanded healthcare coverage on their own are not setting up to oppose the Senate version of the healthcare package. The December 27 story noted that the Senate package, passed on Christmas Eve, would force states struggling to balance their budgets to subsidize the expansion of health care coverage in other states that had not expanded health care coverage by state mandates.

On page 1,980 of the recently passed Senate health care overhaul readers will find the mandates regarding the so-called “Cadillac Tax.” Simply, the Cadillac Tax is a 40 percent excise assessed on all employer-provided health insurance policies that fall into the “luxury” category.

Capitol Dome

Apropos of the unusual Christmas Eve vote, the red “nay” lights and the green “aye” lights on the Senate floor flashed in the expected pattern signaling passage of the senate’s version of a healthcare bill. Just prior to the roll call, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) turned and faced his colleagues across the aisle and poked the air with his forefinger declaring that “this fight is not over. It is far from over.” With that, he took his seat and mutely witnessed the inevitable passage of the healthcare bill by the Senate. Despite being undeniably unpopular among voters, 60 senators stood ceremoniously and added their voice to the majority agreeing to disregard the expressed will of the electorate and shepherd the historic overhaul of health care one step closer to enshrinement as the law of the land.

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