Reforming Health InsuranceAmericans, by and large, want some type of “healthcare reform,” even if they are not for Obama’s version of reform. They are tired of getting the run-around from insurance companies that seem to dispute or deny every claim; they want insurance costs to go down; they want everyone — even those with pre-existing conditions — to have access to affordable health insurance; they don’t believe it’s fair for insurance companies to jack up their rates or drop coverage when an insured makes a costly claim.

ObamaCare & YoueThe new federal healthcare law, often referred to as ObamaCare, will impact all Americans with threats of fines and unprecedented federal intervention in regulating the insurance industry, doctors and healthcare professionals, businesses, and even the family. Art Thompson, CEO of The John Birch Society, explains that the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the reconciliation bill are just a framework to be filled in as bureaucrats add regulations to the new law. “There’s no smoking gun. It’s a cocked pistol that’ll be fired when the regulations come down,” Thompson says, adding that most people “apparently haven’t noticed the fact that this is a program to reach down into every home.” Here’s the impact in brief:

Americans who want to know how ObamaCare, the recently passed healthcare reform package, will impact the nation need only look toward Massachusetts.

medical costsThe Obama administration's own financial experts have estimated that the recently passed Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act will increase — rather than cut — overall medical expenses. During presidential campaign, Obama had sold his healthcare reform package as (in the words of his campaign website) providing "lower costs to make our health care system work for people and businesses." But that's not the healthcare package Obama delivered as President.

The Washington Post has reported that federal regulators are planning to push for the gradual reduction in the amount of salt in foods that Americans consume. This plan would address the amount of salt in processed food, although the federally allowable salt limits had not yet been set. The Food and Drug Administration plans to work in concert with the United States Department of Agriculture to reduce salt consumption by Americans.

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