During a recent interview with Megyn Kelly on Fox News, former Florida Governor Jeb Bush said that — were he to be elected president — his first order of business would not be to repeal President Obama’s executive action granting amnesty to four million illegal aliens. Bush, who has not yet announced himself as a candidate for the Republican nomination in 2016, said that although he did not support the Obama administration's executive action — which he called unconstitutional — he would not remove it (presumably by another executive action) immediately after assuming the presidency. Bush said he would rather rectify the action as part of “meaningful” immigration reform legislation passed by Congress.

 

Speaking in Las Vegas on May 5, presidential candidate Hillary Clinton said that her plan for immigration reform included a way to provide illegal aliens with a way to achieve citizenship. 

 

As of April 20, federal immigration officials had deported 127,378 illegal aliens, which works out to a little over 500,000 deportations a year. In contrast, a report from the Center for Immigration Studies (CIS) back in 2013 noted that total deportations in 2011 (the latest year for which complete numbers were available at the time) numbered 715,495, which, itself, was the lowest level since 1973. The highest number of deportations on record, reported CIS, was in 2000, under the Clinton administration, when 1,864,343 aliens were deported.

Calling the illegals invited into our nation "undocumented Democrats" may be a joke, but the reality is that the plan to fast-track them to voter status is already underway. 

Several immigration-related bills have largely stalled in the Texas legislature, including one to end in-state college tuition rates for illegal aliens.