Last week the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the federal government's case challenging the constitutionality of SB 1070 — Arizona's controversial anti-illegal immigration law. By Joe Wolverton, II

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments April 25 in the Arizona immigration case that pits the right of that state to protect its borders against efforts by the federal government to claim exclusive authority over immigration policy.

By a vote of 64-34 the Alabama House of Representatives Thursday passed a slate of alterations to HB 56, the state’s anti-illegal immigration bill.

The original version of the measure passed last year was described as “one of the toughest in the nation.” Unfortunately, it was just that harshness that forced the state legislature to make changes to the language so as to increase the state’s Attorney General’s ability to defend it in court against the various legal challenges that have been filed against it.

A conservative legal group has sued the federal Homeland Security Department because it refuses to release documents relating to the arrest and possible deportation of Onyango Obama (left), the president’s illegal-alien uncle collared for drunk driving last August in Framingham, Massachusetts.

In an effort to woo Hispanic voters, President Obama made a pledge Saturday to push for immigration reform early in his second term. "This is something I care deeply about, [and] it’s personal to me," Obama told news anchor Enrique Acevedo in a television interview with Univision (left), a network viewed largely by Hispanics in the United States. Obama’s appearances on Univision have been frequent, as Saturday marked the 15th time he has been interviewed by the network, which purportedly reaches 97 percent of Hispanic households in the United States.

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