Ten Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents Thursday filed suit against Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano and ICE Director John Morton, claiming selective enforcement of the nation's immigration laws are forcing them to break the law and ignore their duty in the deportation of Illegal aliens, Fox News reported.

Conflicting rulings came down from the 11th U.S. Court of Appeals in cases involving immigration laws in the states of Alabama and Georgia. According to the federal appeals court on the Georgia law, law enforcement may verify the immigration status of criminal suspects who do not show proper identification. But that same court determined that it would be unconstitutional for the state of Alabama to check the immigration status of schoolchildren when they enroll, or to require illegal immigrants to carry identification.

Terrence J. "TJ" Bonner, retired president of the National Border Patrol Council (the union representing U.S. Border Patrol Agents), was indicted for fraud by a federal grand jury in San Diego late last week. Meanwhile, many other instances of fraud and misconduct by Department of Homeland Security agents and leaders are ignored. Some feel Bonner's treatment was due to his criticism of immigration policy.

Nearly 150,000 illegal-alien criminals are in American jails or on American streets, a U.S. congressman says. And those roaming American cities and towns are there thanks to a U.S. Supreme Court decision that forbids the government from indefinitely incarcerating the criminals if the United States cannot deport them after their sentences are over.

Millions of illegal aliens queued up across the country on Wednesday to get papers to stay in the country.

The illegals, almost all of them from either Mexico or other Hispanic nations, got into line to apply for President Obama’s “youth amnesty.” That policy, announced in June, essentially established the DREAM Act as federal law, even though the act failed in the Senate in December 2010.

Although Obama set out a list of DREAM-like criteria for “young” illegals, the day before the amnesty began the administration began loosening the rules so that they applied to just about any young and illegal immigrant.