Immigration

Texas has joined Georgia, Alabama, Arizona, and host of other states in the battle against illegal immigration, and illegal alien activists are just an angry in the Lone Star State as they are in the others.

The state Senate has passed a law that permits police to question the immigration status of arrestees and those they legally detain. And, importantly, cities in Texas will no longer be permitted to establish themselves as sanctuaries for illegal aliens.

National correspondent Andy Ramirez of the Liberty News Network stepped up his criticism of the National Border Patrol Council (NBPC) labor union on several fronts in a new video report released over the weekend (below), addressing multiple issues including the case of jailed Border Patrol agent Jesus Diaz, Jr. and some of the union’s shortcomings.

Georgia state capitolGeorgia’s new law targeting illegal aliens is working — even before it goes into effect on July 1. Illegal aliens are already scampering out of the state, just as the law's proponents expected would happen. But leftists have filed a lawsuit in federal court to stop implementation of the new law.

Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley signed the state’s tough immigration law on Thursday, inviting an immediate challenge from the radical left, including the American Civil Liberties Union and Southern Poverty Law Center.

Top GOP legislators say the bill is required to stem the tide of illegal aliens who are costing the state hundreds of millions of dollars annually. The politically-correct lobby labels the bill as hateful and racist.

Alabama has joined Arizona in the legal battle against illegal aliens. Last week, the state passed a law that, legislators hope, will send illegal aliens scampering for the state's borders and from there out of the country. Thus is the Yellowhammer state likely now in the crosshairs of the Obama Administration, which sued Arizona after it approved its crackdown on border jumpers.

As expected, the illegal amnesty lobby has been raging about the bill for some time and has threatened to sue if Alabama's governor signs the bill. He is likely to do so, and Alabama can expect a lengthy legal battle defending the bill.

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