Border FenceIn 1846, in the aftermath of the U.S. annexation of Texas, Mexican forces attacked Americans at Fort Brown, Texas, at the Rio Grande River — in part over a border dispute. Later, the city of Brownsville, named after Major Jacob Brown, grew around the fort and presided over much of Texas’ rich and colorful history. Contributing to that history is the beautiful Rio Grande River, which is also the international border between the United States and Mexico. Nowadays, the city finds itself in the uneasy position of, once again, defining that border. Parts of the city and the lush farmlands around it (known in Texas as “the Valley”) are now severed by an ugly 18-foot iron fence that has forever altered peaceful Valley life and stands as a harbinger of uncertainty and discord as border tensions escalate. The New American traveled to Brownsville to investigate the fence and its unintended consequences.

Border Patrol Agent Jesus E. DiazDedicated to all law-enforcement officers who serve honorably each day knowing what it could cost them by doing so, and to those we lost.

American Catholic bishops, equating socialism with true Christian charity, have long been allies of the radical Left in its plans to socialize the American economy. Now they wish to alter the demographic landscape of the United States with unfettered immigration, and are encouraging Catholics to help undermine the effort to ensure that foreign workers are legally employed in the United States.

Texas has joined Georgia, Alabama, Arizona, and host of other states in the battle against illegal immigration, and illegal alien activists are just an angry in the Lone Star State as they are in the others.

The state Senate has passed a law that permits police to question the immigration status of arrestees and those they legally detain. And, importantly, cities in Texas will no longer be permitted to establish themselves as sanctuaries for illegal aliens.