In the days that have followed the enactment by Arizona Governor Jan Brewer of the Support Our Law Enforcement and Safe Neighborhoods Act, repercussions have sounded throughout the nation and the world. Legislators and larks have decried the decision by the people of the Grand Canyon State and their elected representatives to proactively enforce existing federal immigration laws, thus beginning the burdensome process of retarding the unlawful invasion of the United States from across the porous southern border. Lawsuits and lamentations dog the new law set to go into effect by the first of August.

The state of Alabama offers driver's license tests in Japanese, Korean, German, Arabic, Chinese, Farsi, French, Greek, Russian, Spanish, Thai, and Vietnamese. And English. Tim James, a Republican candidate for Governor, says that's 12 languages too many.

Jan BrewerTony Estrada is a cop’s cop. For 43 years he has protected and served the citizens of Santa Cruz County and Nogales, Arizona. For 25 years he was a Nogales City police officer, and for the past 18 years, he has served as sheriff of Santa Cruz County. Sheriff Estrada proudly claims to be the state’s only Hispanic sheriff, but he quickly asserts that his ethnicity is not the reason he opposes Arizona’s new anti-illegal immigration law, SB 1070.

ObamaPresident Barack Obama on Friday took aim at Arizona's strict new law aimed at curbing the flood of illegal immigrants in the state, calling the state legislation an example of "irresponsibility." Obama called on Congress to pass "comprehensive immigration reform" during a White House naturalization ceremony for 24 members of America's armed forces.

The Arizona legislature moved another step closer to giving the state one of the toughest anti-illegal immigration laws in the country on April 19, as the state Senate passed Senate Bill 1070 by a 17-11 vote. Governor Jan Brewer has five days in which to sign the bill into law.

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