The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) stated in a press release on August 29 that it had signed a national Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the United Mexican States. The memorandum, states the release, “is designed to further strengthen their collaborative efforts to provide immigrant, migrant and otherwise vulnerable Mexican workers and their employers with guidance and information and access to education about their rights and responsibilities under the laws enforced by the EEOC.”

The U.S. Department of Justice announced in a press release on September 2 that it had “reached an agreement” with Culinaire International, a Houston, Texas-based catering and restaurant management company, resolving a claim that Culinaire had engaged in “citizenship discrimination” during the work eligibility verification process. DOJ said that the company’s policies were in violation of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA).    

In a settlement reached with plaintiffs represented by the ACLU on August 20, the federal government agreed to allow some illegal immigrants who returned to Mexico under the government’s “Voluntary Return” program to return to the United States.

According to an estimate from the Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR), the cost of educating the thousands of illegal immigrant children who have recently crossed the border is $761 million this school year.

In an August 15 letter to Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa), Thomas Winkowski, principal deputy assistant secretary of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), acknowledged that in Fiscal Year 2013, ICE released 36,007 criminal aliens from ICE custody. The letter admitted that 169 of these had a “homicide-related conviction,” and that 131 have been “issued a final order of removal.” Furthermore, noted the letter, 154 of the 169 were released pursuant to court order or due to [the court case known as] Zadvydas.”