A review of the historical record finds no constitutional basis exists for granting citizenship to the children of foreigners on U.S. soil.

During a post-election press conference at the White House on November 5, President Obama said, “before the end of the year, we’re going to take whatever lawful actions that I can take that I believe will improve the functioning of our immigration system.”

The Republican takeover of the Senate in the November 4 elections demonstrated that President Obama’s delay of his plan to implement “immigration reform” by executive action, was, if anything, counterproductive to his party’s efforts.

Several sheriffs across the nation, as well as a number of senators and senatorial candidates, have warned about the dangers that will result from President Obama’s stated plan to grant amnesty (under the guise of a “path to citizenship”) to many of the estimated 11 million illegal aliens living in the United States.

While speaking in support of Democratic Governor Dan Malloy in Bridgeport, Connecticut, on November 2, President Obama was interrupted at least four times by activists scattered throughout the room who urged him to use executive action to address immigration. What was surprising, however, given Obama’s history of strong support for “immigration reform” that includes amnesty for illegal immigrants, is that those who heckled him objected to his “strong” stance on deportations.