Wednesday, 18 February 2009

Who Wants the U.S. to Get LOST?

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Cover of The New American for March 2, 2009Like virtually all other treaties flowing out of the United Nations, the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea is not what it purports to be. Stripped to its bare essence, it is a naked grab for power, an effort to transfer power from the nation-state to the emerging world-state. It comes as no surprise to those who study U.S. foreign policy that the major organizational force promoting the convention is the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR), the premier organization in the United States promoting global governance. One of the first major send-offs for LOST was an article entitled "Who Will Own the Oceans?" in the council's journal, Foreign Affairs, in April 1976. Between then and now the CFR's membership, along with its substantial assets and influence, has been summoned to propel this unwanted treaty to its near-ratified present status.

Hundreds of members have promoted the convention in their capacities as officials of the federal government — in both Republican and Democratic administrations. Still more have provided "expert" testimony before Senate committees, written op-eds for major newspapers, appeared on news programs, or spoken before influential political and commercial forums. Dozens of other world government-promoting groups have been brought onboard to aid the effort: the World Federalist Association, the United Nations Association, Citizens for Global Solutions, the Brookings Institution, the Carnegie Endowment, the Rockefeller Foundation, etc. In most of these cases, CFR members play a central role as officers and spokesmen, creating the false appearance of a massive groundswell of popular support. In reality, the CFR and its ancillary groups comprise only a few thousand members. However, their strategic placement inside our government, the media, academia, and the corporatist elite has given them influence vastly disproportionate to their numbers.

For more on LOST, click here. In the linked article you will find that most of the key people mentioned — Bernard Oxman, John Norton Moore, John Negroponte, Condoleezza Rice, Susan Rice, Strobe Talbott, Colin Powell, John Kerry — are longtime CFR members.