In Federalist #84, Alexander Hamilton asked, "For why declare that things shall not be done, which there is no power to do?" To Hamilton (and his co-authors, John Jay and James Madison) such a question made sense. How could the national government exercise authority not granted to it by the newly proposed Constitution? It could not, they insisted.

There is more to the overwhelming $1.1 trillion spending bill than what initially meets the eye, including $8 billion in earmarks. What's worse is that the spending bill and presence of earmarks reveals the hypocrisy of elected officials who adamantly decried pork barrel politics and overspending.

Today, the House of Representatives is expected to vote on the tax cut extensions approved by the Senate yesterday by a vote of 81 to 19. The House has allotted three hours for general debate and is expected to introduce a single amendment to the bill, one that would change the estate tax provision of the bill, believed to be "too generous" to the rich. While the House of Representatives is hammering out the details of the tax cut legislation, the Senate begins debate on the START treaty.

While the Senate is undergoing significant deliberation proceedings regarding the tax cut bill, Senate Democrats indicate that they have not forgotten about the U.S.-Russia Nuclear Arms Treaty, START. Much to the chagrin of Senate Democrats, however, Republicans are threatening to delay proceedings on the Treaty, as well as other pieces of legislation.

The Transportation Security Administration has undergone harsh criticism in recent months for its use of naked body scanners during screenings. The majority of the criticism has focused on the constitutionality and intrusiveness of the scanners. New studies reveal, however, that there is yet another reason to oppose the airport naked body scanners: they fail to secure airports.

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