Alaska’s GOP Senate primary produced one of the most shocking outcomes of this year’s primaries when Tea Party candidate Joe Miller emerged as the victor over incumbent Lisa Murkowski. Speculation soon erupted over the possibility of Murkowski attempting to secure a nomination from Alaska’s Libertarian Party in order to remain a contender.

One of the most outspoken advocates on behalf of a Big Government-Big Media merger is avowed socialist Robert McChesney, the Gutgsell Endowed Professor in the Department of Communication at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is the President and co-founder of Free Press, a national organization pushing an agenda that includes media reform "solutions" that advocate Big Media bailouts and government-funded public-private partnerships. Professor McChesney also hosts the "Media Matters" weekly radio program every Sunday afternoon on WILL-AM, a "public" radio station that receives about 60 percent of its funding from the federal and state governments and liberal-left tax-exempt foundations.

The National Institutes of Health, an agency of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, has reportedly spent $1.4 million on a study, conducted by University of Illinois Professor Dr. Stevan Merril Weine, involving a group of married Tajik migrant workers in Moscow who have engaged in sexual interactions with wives, girlfriends, and prostitutes.

last wordNewspaper headlines and lead-ins on TV news programs no longer feature daily coverage of the plans to build a mosque and Islamic center near Manhattan's Ground Zero. But the controversy about the proposed project, only two blocks from the scene of the 2001 attack on the Twin Towers, isn't dead. In fact, the outcome appears to be headed in favor of what the project's backers have always wanted.

protest against FBI raidsMembers of left-wing war protest organizations plan vigorous protests Monday and Tuesday after a series of FBI raids on September 24 against the homes of war protesters in Chicago, Minnesota, Michigan, and North Carolina. No one was arrested in the raids, though FBI officials seized dozens of boxes of personal effects, mainly electronics and letters, from the houses. The FBI said they expected no arrests from the searches under a grand jury inquiry on what officials termed an investigation on "material support for terrorism."