Now that the Department of Transportation is opening a formal investigation into the 2009-2010 Toyota Corolla over possible steering problems while the government is continuing with hearings by the U.S. House Oversight and Government Reform Committee on February 24th, the House Energy and Commerce Committee on February 25th, and by the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee on March 2nd about Toyota’s “timely” response to braking and accelerator complaints, some are beginning to question “Why?”

All of the Washington/New York conservative establishment convened several days before the annual CPAC conference and came up with the “Mount Vernon Statement” of principles to which they subscribe. The Mount Vernon Statement is — with one glaring and incongruous exception — a worthy statement of adherence to constitutional principles.  

tea partyThe Tea Party movement is rapidly becoming the most widely discussed political movement of our time. When you are written about in the New York Times, in however backhanded a fashion (with all the obligatory references to militia groups, right-wing extremists, racist wingnuts who hate the first black president, etc., ad nauseam), you know you have the mainstream media establishment’s attention.

FDRAs reported by Tom Eddlem in The New American, President Obama on February 12 signed legislation to increase the federal government's borrowing authority by nearly $2 trilion, on behalf of all of us who will be stuck with the astronomical promissory note. Perhaps to distract from the jaw-dropping bottom line of that stroke of the pen, President Obama followed up the following day with an address filled with language that sounds nearly like a parody of the discourses he so often delivers.

The “Mount Vernon Statement” to be announced today at the start of the Conservative Political Action Conference in Washington, D.C. is a “broad statement of principle aimed at giving a coherent framework” to the Tea Party and other activist movements on the right.