mohammed jawadWhile the U.S. mainstream media is awash in news that the Bush-era policy of torturing detainees “worked” in the case of Khalid Sheik Mohammed, neocon-influenced media outlets have virtually blacked out coverage of the case of child prisoner at Guantanamo Mohammad Jawad. Perhaps that because Jawad — who was released without charges last week and days later announced he would be suing the U.S. government — is a textbook example of how the Bush policy of torture not only didn't work, but how it corrupted the entire U.S. system of justice.

gun-rightsIn an August 31 editorial, the editors of the USA Today have entered the debate over the presence of firearms at political protests with a seemingly-reasonable point of view: Use common sense. In the words of the editorial: “Carrying guns openly outside presidential events may be legal in many states, but it sure isn't smart.”

ted KennedyThe recently reposed Senator Edward M. “Ted” Kennedy (D-Mass.) left a legacy of federal legislation that has brought moral and financial ruin to millions of the poor whom he claimed to champion. His more lasting legacy may be an army of powerful government acolytes whom he infused with his brand of Marxist political beliefs, and who are bent on emulating their mentor in eliminating our few remaining natural rights.

Zach SpaceWhen two-term congressman Zack Space decided he didn't want to hold any public town hall-style meeting in his Ohio district this summer, local high-school football coach Dave Daubenmire took his right to air grievances straight to Rep. Space's doorstep. Daubenmire has been camping out in front of Space's district office since August 27, and says he will continue to do so until Space agrees to a “a fair and open forum” where citizens can air their complaints against the "Blue Dog" Democrat.

veilTo cries of outrage from the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and the Michigan branch of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, the Michigan Supreme Court has issued a ruling allowing state courts to “exercise reasonable control” over the appearance of individuals summoned before the court. The ruling has sparked such an outcry because the matter which is at issue is the power of judges to regulate the wearing of the veil — common among Moslem women — while they are testifying in a court of law.

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