GeithnerOn June 10, Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner announced several ways that the Obama administration intends to change corporate practices for determining executive compensation. The administration will support “say on pay” legislation, so named because it is supposed to give shareholders a say on how top executives are compensated, and other legislation granting the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) power to make sure that compensation committees “are more independent.” Additionally, famous Washington lawyer Kenneth R. Feinberg was named as an overseer of executive compensation packages for companies bailed out by the government.

Sonia SotomayorSoon America will move, in all likelihood, from a Supreme Court with a Justice David Souter as a member to a court with a Justice Sonia Sotomayor. Neither the alphabetical order of the justices nor the constitutional disorder will change. Little will change but gender and ethnicity, which the major news media would have us believe are the most important considerations.

paperworkOn May 28, the Competitive Enterprise Institute released the 2009 edition of their report on the impact of federal regulation. Entitled Ten Thousand Commandments: An Annual Snapshot of the Federal Regulatory State, the 51-page PDF delves into the morass of regulation oozing out of Washington. The Executive Summary of the report is posted at the institute’s website and gives a quick overview of the report’s findings.

D'EscotoUnited Nations General Assembly President Miguel D'Escoto Brockmann intends to leave his mark on the United Nations and the global economic-political picture before his one-year term ends in September. D'Escoto, a longtime top official in the communist Sandinista government of Nicaragua, has chosen as his primary vehicle for making this mark the UN Conference on the World's Financial and Economic Crisis to be held June 24-26 at the UN headquarters in New York.

Karen Handel, Georgia secretary of stateKaren Handel, Georgia secretary of state, issued a scathing press release following a decision by the U.S. Department of Justice to deny preclearance for Georgia's (already implemented) plan to verify the legitimacy of its voter-registration lists, including verifying whether or not applicants are U.S. citizens. Because Georgia, like many other southern states, must pre-clear its voting procedures with the U.S. Department of Justice, denial of preclearance equates to denial of permission to do it.

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