Last week, the Texas Republican Party Convention, the largest political gathering in the world, convened in Fort Worth, Texas, with an estimated 6,000 to 7,000 delegates in attendance. While the event ended Saturday without any of the physical violence that has accompanied some state conventions, still the marked differences between the establishment Republicans and the emerging younger grassroots conservative activists were clear.

Wayne Allyn Root, former Las Vegas odds maker, reiterated his prediction from last December that Romney would win big in November.

Representative Peter King (R-N.Y.) and other Republicans in Congress have accused President Obama of using security leaks that detail the counter-terror programs of his administration to “build his reputation” before the November elections.

"He's trying to be like George Patton or John Wayne," contended King, Chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, adding,

This is the most shameful cascade of leaks I've ever heard [of] or seen in government. It's clear from those stories this came right from the White House, came right from the National Security Council, came right from the Situation Room. ...

It has to lead to people very high up in the administration in his White House.

 

 

Two recent polls show that Americans support Arizona’s tough immigration law that the Obama administration is trying to overturn in the U.S. Supreme Court. The CNN and CBS/New York Times surveys both show that most Americans clearly don’t think the law is racist and believe the states should play a role in enforcing immigration law.

 

Lest there was any lingering doubt, the federal judge who enjoined enforcement of the indefinite detention provisions of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) told the Obama Administration that it may not legally detain an American indefinitely based on a suspicion of support of terrorism unless the government can demonstrate a connection to the attacks of September 11, 2001.

In a memorandum clarifying her ruling from May 16, Judge Katherine B. Forrest of the Southern District of New York reaffirmed her earlier opinion stating plainly that her earlier order stands and that the objections raised by the government in its request for a reconsideration were not valid.

Affiliates and Friends

Social Media