Back in 2005 Congress passed a law, which President George W. Bush then signed, forcing sellers of products containing the decongestant pseudoephedrine to store such medicines behind the counter and dole them out to customers, logging each purchase to ensure that no one buys more than the feds’ arbitrarily-set limits on these drugs. The idea was to prevent people from purchasing large quantities of the medications and turning them into methamphetamines.

When Rep. Doug Lamborn (R-Colo.) introduced a bill in the 111th Congress to defund National Public Radio (NPR), two things were working against him: the overwhelming collectivist mindset of that Congress itself, and the fact that NPR hadn’t yet embarrassed itself sufficiently to build public opinion against the agency. In light of NPR’s series of gaffes since then, as well as the more conservative tone of the new 112th Congress, Lamborn has decided to try again.  

medical costObamaCare was marketed to the American people as healthcare reform — something that would ensure that everyone could obtain health insurance and never lose it. It was most certainly not sold to us as a package of tax increases, especially considering that candidate Barack Obama had made “a firm pledge” that under his administration “no family making less than $250,000 a year will see any form of tax increase. Not your income tax, not your payroll tax, not your capital gains taxes, not any of your taxes.”

gavelWhen the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear oral arguments on a Fourth Amendment case decided by the Kentucky Supreme Court (Kentucky v. King), alarm bells went off. Under the Fourth Amendment, as readers are no doubt aware, “the right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”

US soldier in IraqAccording to President Barack Obama, combat in Iraq involving U.S. troops ended on August 31. Four-and-a-half months later, American soldiers are still dying in the sands of Mesopotamia. The Wall Street Journal reports that two separate January 15 attacks in Iraq left three U.S. soldiers dead.

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