The first day of congressional hearings on the radicalization of the American Islamic community (being led by House Homeland Security Committee Chairman Rep. Peter T. King, R-N.Y.) proved to be one that was emotionally-charged and riddled with controversy, revealing the true attitudes and intentions of many liberal Democrats on Islamic radicalization in the United States.

In light of recent extensions of the Patriot Act, it can be concluded that many Tea Partiers are reneging on parts of the Tea Party agenda. Of the 41 Tea Party-backed candidates, 31 voted to extend the Patriot Act, eight voted against it, and one did not vote. As John Tyner stated at Lewrockwell.com: "Despite the eight nea votes, Tea Party-backed candidates overwhelmingly backed an extension of the Patriot Act."

According to an appeal by Obama’s top aides to his potential 2012 campaign donors, the President's reelection effort will be significantly more difficult than was his 2008 campaign. The appeal indicates that the President is in a weaker position now than he was in 2008, and details the potential vulnerabilities of his likely presidential opponents in order to garner much-needed support.

Americans concerned about exposure to potentially dangerous levels of radiation from the Transportation Security Administration’s full-body scanners just got another reason to worry: USA Today reports that on March 11 the TSA announced “that it would retest every full-body X-ray scanner that emits ionizing radiation — 247 machines at 38 airports — after maintenance records on some of the devices showed radiation levels 10 times higher than expected.”

State Department publicity of the mistreatment of accused Wikileaker Bradley Manning has prompted a response from President Obama on March 11, forced the resignation of State Department spokesman P.J. Crowley, and caused Brian Manning to break the family's public silence on his son's treatment.