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Voice of America and other news sources reported on October 4 that the Pakistani Taliban had claimed responsibility for an attack on about 20 tanker trucks carrying fuel bound for NATO troops in neighboring Afghanistan. The report cited a police report that claimed that at least three people were killed when militant gunmen fired on the tankers and then set them on fire. The attack occurred at a truck depot near Pakistan’s capital, Islamabad, before dawn on October 4. 

A Pakistani Taliban spokesman told reporters that the attacks would continue until the supply convoys are stopped. The militant group also said it was avenging NATO drone strikes on Pakistani territory.

In a private meeting that took place last week, Nevada's Republican senatorial candidate Sharron Angle was recorded urging third-party candidate Scott Ashjian to drop out of the race, as well as condemning the Republican Party for its failure to adhere to its original principles.

San Francisco is considering a new city ordinance that would prohibit McDonald’s from putting a toy in its Happy Meal boxes unless it also included fruit and vegetables and reduced the calories of the Happy Meal. This proposal is just one of several recent efforts by San Francisco to restrict the freedom of its citizens so that they are healthier. The city has banned the sale of sweetened soda drinks from vending machines on city property and banned the sale of tobacco from groceries.

Despite the best efforts of gun-control organizations, Americans are gaining more and more freedom to keep and bear arms. Forty-eight states now have laws allowing citizens to carry concealed weapons, and nearly that number have laws allowing open carry of guns as well. Many of these states place certain restrictions on both types of carrying, often requiring gun toters to obtain a permit, but the progress toward more firearms freedom is clearly gaining momentum.

CongressIn their haste to leave Washington and attempt to rescue whatever might be left of their political careers, politicians put off until a lame-duck session any serious discussion of last-minute agenda items. And many of those aren't expected to see the light of day at the post-election session set to being November 15, according to The Hill. Alexander Bolton wrote that "Democrats will be hard-pressed to pass even a small part of their lame-duck agenda."

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