According to a local news station, a Milwaukee man named Terry Duncan received a $500 fine last week for cursing on a public bus. While the Milwaukee County sheriff’s deputies assert that the man’s behavior was rude, Duncan himself views the fine as a violation of free speech.

For years the small town of Prichard, Alabama knew they were in trouble. Back in 2004, the city hired an actuary to analyze and summarize their employees� pension plan. He told the city the plan would run out of money by the summer of 2009: �The plan is projected to exhaust [all of its] assets around [the middle of] 2009.� In September of that year, the city stopped mailing pension checks to its 150 beneficiaries because there was no more money in the account.

With the 2010 lame suck session now in the past, what many hope will be a more conservative 112th Congress is poised to begin. As House control transitions from Democrat to Republican, a new agenda rests on the table, and includes an entirely different approach to immigration.

Glenn BeckAs if conservative pundit Glenn Beck was not enough of a target to the Left, Time magazine’s Joe Klein has branded him with a new and more contentious title: a “John Birch Society conspiracy theorist.” Beck, however, may not recoil at the epithet.

While most politicians campaign on the premise that they are “one of us,” they seem to lose touch with the American people once in office. Three elected officials, however — all Republican members of the House — refuse to let that happen: Tea Party endorsee Joe Walsh of Illinois, Bobby Schilling of Illinois, and Mike Kelly of Pennsylvania. All three have indicated their intent to reject the congressional health care plan.

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