Texas Republican Representative Ron Paul has been dubbed “Dr. No” for his consistent record of voting against legislation that he has called unconstitutional, at times serving as the only “no” vote in the entire House of Representatives. Paul’s position on a variety of issues has even been unpopular in his own party, which he accuses of losing sight of true conservative values.

Early last October police in Watertown, Wisconsin, were called to the local high school, where a school official had reported that a 17-year-old female student in his office was complaining of having been physically assaulted by another student.

More than two and a half years have passed since massacre at Virginia Tech left over 30 students and faculty dead in the wake of Seung-Hui Cho’s shooting spree, and the Department of Education has now determined that university was in violation of federal law.

Governments’ dealings with paid informers are always risky. By his willingness to snitch on his friends and associates, the informer has demonstrated his untrustworthiness, so it is difficult for his handlers to know when he is telling the truth and when he is fabricating information either to settle old scores or simply to keep the largess flowing. The problem of knowing whom to trust only becomes more intractable when operating in foreign countries.

Conservatives may have lost some battles for committee chairmen in the incoming Republican-dominated House of Representatives, but they are making up for it when it comes to subcommittees. For economic conservatives there is the appointment of Rep. Ron Paul of Texas to head the Financial Services Subcommittee on Domestic Monetary Policy and Technology. Social conservatives, meanwhile, scored a victory with the selection of the staunchly pro-life Rep. Joseph Pitts of Pennsylvania as chairman of the Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Health.

Log in