As duplicative and wasteful federal programs go unreformed, a report published Tuesday by the Government Accountability Office (GAO) affirms that the government is wasting "tens of billions of dollars" every year. According to the GAO, a nonpartisan investigative arm of Congress, nearly every agency of the Executive Branch could use improvement.

The Pentagon (left) released a report February 29 revealing that some cremated remains of individuals killed in the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the Pentagon, as well as from the jetliner that crashed in rural Pennsylvania, ended up in a Virginia landfill. The revelation came from a report by an independent Pentagon panel commissioned to correct procedures at the Armed Forces Mortuary at Dover Air Force Base. As reported by The New American, last year the Air Force admitted that from 2004 to 2008 the mortuary had disposed of the remains of at least 274 fallen soldiers in the landfill, after assuring families that it would deal with the remains of their loved ones in a dignified and respectful manner.

A number of privacy groups have petitioned the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) on the proposed increase in the use of aerial drones in the United States. More than 30 organizations, including the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), the Bill of Rights Defense Committee, and the Electronic Privacy Information Center — which have also served as key opponents to the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security — have demanded that the FAA hold a rulemaking session to consider all the violations to American privacy and safety posed by the proposal.

Federal regulators are proposing more intervention in the U.S. automobile industry, as new safety regulations would require automakers to furnish all new vehicles with rearview cameras by 2014. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) will be transmitting a final copy of the proposed regulation to Congress today — which is expected to be approved — after the rule was originally proposed in 2010.

When Ramona Fricosu’s attorney, Phil DuBois, promised to appeal a lower court’s ruling that she be forced to open encrypted files that may have incriminating data in them and assist the prosecution’s case against her, he never expected the appeals court to deny the appeal until after she had complied with the lower court’s demands.

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