The White House has dropped the threat of a veto of the military authorization bill that would declare the entire world, including the U. S., "homeland," a battlefield and permit the imprisonment of terror suspects, including American citizens, indefinitely and without trial.

In its press release on Tuesday the Institute for Justice announced it is going to bat for the freedom of tour guides in New Orleans to speak. The city currently has a law in place that says that “no person shall offer to act as a sightseeing tour guide on the roads, sidewalks, public spaces, or waterways of [the city] unless the person holds a valid sightseeing tour guide license.” Violation of the ordinance can result in a fine up to $300 and five months in jail.

Some top Republicans are clashing over an Amendment to the Stop Online Piracy Act. Texas Republican Rep. Lamar Smith proposed an amendment to SOPA that House oversight committee Chairman Darrell Issa (left) said would not fix piracy and instead would give too much broad power to Attorney General Eric Holder's Department of Justice.

While Republican voters shift their political inclinations from one presidential candidate to another, as they peruse political records, judge personal character, and appraise other qualities they find meaningful in a potential U.S. President, one distinct issue many voters seem to overlook is the degree of power and influence that crony capitalism has played in some of these candidates' professional lives.

Mitt Romney, once seen as the all-but-prohibitive favorite for the Republican presidential nomination, has personally gone on the offensive against rival candidate Newt Gingrich, who now leads Romney in some polls and has been gaining on him in others. In an interview with the New York Times on Wednesday, Romney called the former Speaker of the House "zany" and accused him of attacking free enterprise.