If you are stopped for speeding or arrested for an unpaid fine, you may be subjected to a strip search and thorough inspection of even the most private body parts, the U.S. Supreme Court said Monday in another controversial 5-4 decision. Justice Anthony Kennedy (left) sided with the court's conservative bloc and wrote the opinion of the court in Florence v. Board of Chosen Freeholders of County of Burlington, the case of Albert Florence, a New Jersey man apprehended in a motor vehicle stop and arrested for an allegedly unpaid fine. In fact, Florence had already paid the fine, but the bench warrant for his arrest had, "for some unexplained reason," not been removed from the statewide computer database at the time of the arrest, Kennedy said.

Jeff Sessions“I was floored by what we discovered,” declared Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.).

Jimmy CarterFormer President Jimmy Carter, who is in the midst of a tour promoting his new NIV study Bible (see The New American’s coverage), recently threw a curve concerning his long time “pro-choice” position on abortion, suggesting that the Democratic Party should tone down its aggressive pro-abortion platform. Appearing March 29 on conservative pundit Laura Ingraham’s radio show, Carter said, “I never have believed that Jesus Christ would approve of abortions, and that was one of the problems I had when I was president having to uphold Roe v. Wade and I did everything I could to minimize the need for abortions.”

The Arizona state legislature has passed an Internet censorship bill that has provoked the ire of liberty seeking Arizonians. The bill extends telephone harassment laws to the Internet and other means of electronic communication. Under the pretense of being anti-bullying, the bill states that virtually anything said online that is deemed “offensive” by the state, to include editorials, illustrations, etc., could be a punishable offense.

According to a Senate fact sheet, HB 2549 "[p]rohibits using any electronic or digital device, instead of a telephone, with the intent to terrify, intimidate, threaten, harass, annoy or offend a person." HB 2549 was sponsored principally by Representatives Ted Vogt (left), Vic Williams, and Chad Campbell.

As the nation faces a crucial election in a little over six months, the Republican Party appears to be caving in on a social issue that many conservatives consider of major import: same-sex marriage. What the GOP felt strongly enough about some 16 years ago to lead the fight for passage of the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), many members are beginning to consider an issue open to compromise. Not only do many Republican House and Senate members consider “gay” marriage a “dead issue,” according to Politico.com, but Republican leadership has “evolved” to the point that it has quietly worked “behind the scenes to kill amendments that reaffirm opposition to same-sex unions,” the politics website reported.

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