Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney has lately been arguing strenuously against the Obama administration’s decision to force all employers, regardless of their religious convictions, to provide insurance coverage for contraception, including contraceptives that can cause abortions. The government's decision has been widely denounced by officials of the Roman Catholic and Orthodox churches because they are opposed to both birth control (except in certain limited circumstances) and abortion.

On Monday, attorneys representing Arizona Governor Jan Brewer (left) filed their opening brief with the clerk of the U.S. Supreme Court. In the filing, the Governor asks the high court to overturn an injunction handed down by the district court blocking the enforcement of several key provisions of the Grand Canyon State’s controversial anti-illegal immigration statute passed in 2010

In the latest controversy over President Obama’s infamous “contraception mandate,” the administration is coming under attack for attempting to prevent military chaplains from reading a letter from Timothy Broglio (left), Archbishop for the Military Services, U.S.A., warning Catholic military personnel about the government’s attack on their religious freedoms. According to, the U.S. Army’s Office of the Chief of Chaplains determined that Catholic priests serving as Army chaplains were not to read the archbishop’s letter from the pulpit.

A congressional committee is currently weighing in on the battle over union dues, calling it an issue of economic freedom, which is sure to enrage union leaders and spark massive debates at both the state and federal level.

The debate is over whether workers should have union dues automatically deducted from their salaries, even if it is against their wishes. And even in the case where members are happy to comply with giving up their salary for union dues, the hearing is to determine whether it fair for the unions to use some of those dues to fund political campaigns for candidates whom the union members may not support.

Hot on the heals of the news that Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg suggested that new nations look elsewhere for their constitutional inspiration than to our own founding charter of 1787, there is this headline in the New York Times: “‘We the People’ Loses Appeal With People Around the World.”

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