After nearly five years, the Louisville Courier Journal reports, a Somali immigrant's trial in the brutal murder of his children began this week. He also raped and beat his wife. So yet another Muslim immigrant "honor killed" yet again.
 
So brutal was the killing in Lousiville, Kentucky, on Oct. 6, 2006, that even a  hardened detective, the paper reported, choked up on the witness stand when she described the killing, which Said Biyad confessed to police. The cold-blooded killer does not dispute the facts. He claims he is crazy.

gavelWalter Reddy is the patriotic organizer of the Committees of Safety, arguably a founding father of the modern Tea Party movement, and his right to keep and bear arms has been taken from him. It doesn't matter that he has committed no crimes, and has not been charged with a crime. A Connecticut judge told him at a hearing that Reddy had no right to an attorney and that "I'm ready to rule" to take his guns away before the patriotic organizer had the chance to say one word in his defense.

As if it weren’t enough that the Obama administration is spending hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars on an unconstitutional war on Libya, the administration took the occasion of every taxpayer’s favorite day of the year, April 15, to announce that it is going to send $25 million worth of “nonlethal” aid to the rebels fighting against the regime of Col. Moammar Gadhafi.

The Founding Fathers formed America as a republic. The interests of government were limited primarily to protecting freedom, and in those relatively few instances in which the “general welfare” was involved, the interests of government might include other duties as well. Post roads, the regulation of weights and measurements, the enactment of laws to protect copyrights and patents, a navy to protect American shores and shipping, the regulation of new territories until they could become states — these were the sorts of general welfare functions that the Constitution allowed the federal government to undertake.

With the background of Governor Scott Walker in Wisconsin standing up to public employee unions and those unions, with lots of outside help, trying put an overtly favorable candidate into a theoretically nonpolitical Wisconsin Supreme Court election, one might think that state politicians would be cautious about rolling over and playing dead when public employees unions make outrageous demands.