Government rules by command and not consent. The marketplace represents the rational valuation of things based upon mutual consent. Because the power of the state is a “jealous god,” when ordinary people try to create some sort of private protection against the caprice of politicians, government usually comes back with a lash. We see this in a number of ways these days.

On October 18, brothers Jesus and Jose Martinez were robbed of over $190,000 by an armed man. They know who the man is and who employs him, and both the thief and his employer have admitted stealing the money. They took his employer to court to retrieve their money. A judge ordered the money returned, but the employer has refused to return it, saying that he has since passed it on to his superiors, who in turn have no intention of returning it.

Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer, speaking this past weekend on Fox News Sunday, declared that the Founding Fathers did not intend firearms to go unregulated. Breyer was one of four dissenting justices in the 2008 District of Columbia v. Heller case, which overturned a firearms ban in the District of Columbia. The decision in Heller was significant for many reasons, primarily for holding that the Second Amendment was connected with not only the right of individuals to bear arms, but also the power of state governments to maintain militia capable of resisting an oppressive federal government.

Henry HudsonScore one for the Constitution. U.S. District Court Judge Henry E. Hudson, in Richmond, Virginia, ruled December 13 that the ObamaCare individual mandate and its related penalties are unconstitutional, a welcome change of pace from two earlier rulings in favor of the Obama administration.

Nearly everyone with an internet connection knows the website WikiLeaks.org to be the notorious publisher of inconvenient truths about the secret machinations of government and military operations. Scarcely fewer know that the founder, Julian Assange, was arrested last week in London. Only a few are asking the right questions.