Wisconsin’s elected government is under fire again from Democrats, socialists, and government-teachers’ unions over a proposal to cut some state funding for most public-sector schools while limiting their ability to make up the lost revenue through property-tax increases. Critics decried the measure partly because they believe it will increase the number of private educational options available to Wisconsin families.

National Public Radio (NPR) is one of America's most reviled institutions among conservatives. The taxpayer-funded federal agency, which broadcasts in every state, is biased in its scope of programming, featuring a slate of exclusively left-wing commentators and hosts who have made their philosophies known throughout their various media appearances. Despite being paid for by all American taxpayers, NPR features programming that the average American has little use or patience for. NPR has failed to understand the basic principles of supply and demand -- while a media outlet logically should feature programming that its benefactors (in this instance, the taxpayers) find interesting and would support, NPR does not appeal to a diverse cross-section of the American populace.

In the annals of politicized science, Trofim Lysenko provides a supreme example of ignorance and ignominy wedded to power. Lysenko was a two-bit horticulturist who rose to great prominence in the Soviet Union under dictator/mass murderer Joseph Stalin, becoming director of the Soviet Academy of Sciences's Institute of Genetics. Subjugating science to communist ideology and personal whim, Lysenko succeeded in outlawing biological research that was not in accord with his crackpot notions of genetics.

James O'Keefe and his Project Veritas released yet another audio recording of a conversation with an executive for National Public Radio, this one purporting to show that leftist hedge-fund tycoon George Soros has been funding NPR for years. The tape was released the same day the House of Representatives voted to cut off funding to NPR.

capitolThe United States seems to be inching ever closer to intervening in the conflict in Libya despite the obvious dangers of doing so. Sens. John McCain (R-Ariz.), Joseph Lieberman (I-Conn.), and John Kerry (D-Mass.) have all called for the imposition of a no-fly zone over the troubled nation. McCain and Lieberman have even sponsored a resolution urging President Barack Obama to support such an act.