EgyptMassive street protests erupted in Tunisia in late December, which ended the 23-year reign of dictator Zine El Abidine Ben Ali. Fueled largely by an Internet-connected youth movement, the protests were partly a reaction to the publication by WikiLeaks of documents from U.S. diplomatic cables that revealed pandemic corruption by the ruling party, as well as government oppression that included arrests of lawyers, journalists, and political opponents. Another spark helped to ignite the revolt was the dramatic protest by Mohamed Bouazizi, who publicly set himself on fire on December 17 because of frequent government confiscation of his produce in his street vendor’s business and the government’s refusal to issue him the required vendor permits.

An operation run by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) known as Project Gunrunner has been implicated, albeit indirectly so far, in the December 2010 murder of Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry by alleged bandits in Arizona, reports the president of the Law Enforcement Officers Advocates Council Andy Ramirez in a new piece for the Liberty News Network. Now, Agent Terry’s family wants answers and the Justice Department is apparently engaged in what critics are calling a “cover up.”

In a developing story, Fox News has learned that four Americans aboard a yacht hijacked by Somali pirates have been killed. Two of the Americans, Scott and Jean Adam, were the owners of the yacht, and the other two, Phyllis Macay and Bob Riggle, were their friends. The Adams were running a Bible ministry and distributing Bibles to schools and churches in remote villages in a number of areas.

Conservative pundit Glenn Beck has recently made assertions on his Fox News program that Google played a significant role in the Egyptian revolution. Naturally, he was labeled a conspiracy theorist and rumors spread that he advocated boycotting Google, though he has explicitly stated that it was not his intent to provoke a boycott against the company.

Last week, the Arizona State Senate passed a bill, in a 21-8 vote, that could make Arizona the first state to challenge federal overreach into the Interstate Commerce Clause of the U.S. Constitution. It also penalizes federal agents attempting to violate the law. S.B. 1178 states that all goods grown or made in the State, and all services performed within it “are not subject to the authority of Congress under its constitutional power to regulate commerce among the several states."