An Ohio judge’s attempt to display the Ten Commandments in his courtroom violates the Constitution, a federal appeals court has ruled. On February 2, a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit upheld a lower federal court’s ruling that Judge James DeWeese, who presides over the Richland County Common Pleas Court (Motto: "With God, all things are possible.") had violated the First Amendment’s supposed church-state separation clause by displaying a poster containing the Ten Commandments in his courtroom. The ruling marks the second time DeWeese has been thwarted in his attempts to display the biblical mandates in his courtroom.

With the 2012 presidential election already on presidential aspirants' front doorstep, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich is hiking the campaign trail, stomping the path of ethanol subsidies.

Craig Becker is a longtime lawyer for big labor. Among his clients have been the AFL-CIO and the Service Employees International Union (SEIU). When President Obama appointed him to the National Labor Relations Board, the independent federal regulatory agency that deals with union and employer compliance with federal labor laws, among other things, that nomination was rejected by the Democrat-controlled Senate.  President Obama seemed very eager to have him on the NLRB. The President then gave the labor lawyer a recess appointment which allows him to serve through the current year.  Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, when Speaker, severely criticized this appointment. 

Four San Diego firefighters forced by their supervisor to take part in a "gay pride" parade in 2007 have won their case against the city after the California Supreme Court refused to overturn a lower court's decision in their favor.

The shooting rampage in Detroit last week has spurred a re-thinking of so-called “community policing” — a method of making law enforcement appear accessible, friendly, and open to neighborhood folk. Such was par for the course in the 1950s, but then was abandoned in the volatile 1960s, when leftist radicals started inciting students and minorities to attack authority figures. School principals and college professors were barricaded in their offices; police and other law enforcement officers were called “pigs”; squad cars were bombed; anti-riot and SWAT teams were hit with rocks, bricks, and bottles. That the perpetrators of these early, bona fide “hate crimes” constituted but a relatively small, misguided few didn’t seem to make much difference to our nation’s leaders inasmuch as the ruckus could be exploited by an already left-leaning press.