Sen. Dianne FeinsteinOperation “Fast and Furious” — the scandalous sale of thousands of weapons to Mexican drug lords with the complicity of President Obama’s Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (still known as ATF) — is now being used as an excuse for further governmental interference in the rights of American citizens to keep and bear arms. Rather than blaming the ineptitude of a federal agency run amok, Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D.-Calif.) declares that the fundamental problem exposed by the “Fast and Furious” debacle is, in fact, that “anyone can walk in and buy anything” when it comes to firearms.

SolyndraOnly days before Solyndra’s bankruptcy, the Obama administration mulled over a last-minute bailout plan that would have granted the federal government part ownership of the solar panel-maker. The financial rescue would have infused cash into the company and delegated a new board of directors, two of whom would have been appointed by the Energy Department. The bailout plan was orchestrated by the investment banking firm Lazard, which was paid one million dollars to analyze the company’s financial options — and whose Vice Chairman is a major Democratic donor who contributed more than $2,000 to Obama’s 2008 campaign. However, the plan was ultimately rejected by the Energy Department.

When word surfaced from Politico last Sunday of sexual harassment allegations against presidential contender Herman Cain dating back to the late 1990s, questions naturally arose as to the source of the leak. The fingers have pointed in a number of directions, most notably to two of Cain's Republican rivals, Mitt Romney and Rick Perry.

A District Court judge in Goffstown, New Hampshire has dismissed a criminal charge against a Weare man for recording his conversation with a police officer during a traffic stop. Judge Edward Tenney followed a recent First Circuit Court of Appeals decision in Boston in Glik v. Cunniffe in ruling that William Alleman was within his constitutional rights when making an audio recording of Weare Police Officer Brandon Montplaisir during the traffic stop on July 10, 2010.

Sheriff Chuck Wright (left) of Spartanburg County, South Carolina, opened a news conference on Monday about an assault and attempted rape on Sunday in a local park by exhorting his law-abiding citizens to protect themselves from criminals: “Our form of justice is not making it. Carry a concealed weapon. That’ll fix it.” Wright was pointing to the example of 46-year-old habitual criminal Walter Lance, of Spartanburg, to express his frustration with the flawed justice system that allows such a man to still be out on the streets committing crimes. Lance's latest arrest was for allegedly choking a woman walking her dog in Spartanburg's Milliken Park on Sunday and attempting to rape her.

Affiliates and Friends

Social Media