As the August 2 deadline for the debt ceiling approaches, Republicans and Democrats are preparing for battle over the vote. In bold language, Republicans have demanded that major spending cuts accompany any increase of the debt limit. Bipartisan talks on the subject have achieved nothing, as Democrats have sidestepped any mention of the debt ceiling. Some elected officials have grown frustrated with this tactic, especially Tea Party favorite Rand Paul. In a clip from C-SPAN�s �Newsmakers,� the Kentucky Senator announced his intent to filibuster any legislation unrelated to the debt ceiling:

Over the years, the Federal Trade Commission�s promotion of "consumer protection" has escalated, and a dominant role the agency currently holds involves regulating corporate marketing strategies. The FTC�s latest victim in the arena of consumer protection is food marketing, more specifically, food marketing to children.

Legislated in 1914 by President Woodrow Wilson, the Federal Trade Commission Act was a "trust-busting" prescription of the Progressive Era, but it further evolved into a broad, regulatory regime that now envelopes the private marketplace.

The reintroduced DREAM Act is worse than the original that was defeated in 2010, Republican Sen. Jeff Sessions says, noting that most of what people think about the idea is false.

As the list of GOP contenders for the White House continues to burgeon, voters are sizing up the field and picking favorites � including Democrat Bill Clinton. At the Aspen Ideas Festival on Saturday evening, the former President told reporters that he liked Republican presidential hopefuls Jon Huntsman and Mitt Romney.

Unsurprisingly, the reasons that Clinton likes the two men are the very same ones that concern potential GOP voters. Clinton commented:

 

After weeks of negotiations between Democrat Governor Mark Dayton (left) and the Republican-dominated legislature, no resolution to Minnesota's $5 billion budget shortfall was reached and, except for some essential services, the Minnesota state government shut down at midnight, June 30. Governor Dayton maintained that he had done all that he could to meet the Republicans halfway, but he was determined that higher taxes on wealthy citizens was the only way to close the budget gap. He said, "They [the Republicans] don't want to raise revenues on anyone, and I believe the wealthiest Minnesotans can afford to pay more taxes."