The maxim that eternal vigilance is the price of liberty is never so true as when the integrity of our Constitution is threatened. The statists have been pursuing their goal of deconstructing that inimitable document for a long, long time.

Ah, the ironies of politics. The late Sen. Edward Kennedy, an early and steadfast proponent of national health insurance, turns out to have spared Americans from such a fate for nearly 40 years.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, seated in Philadelphia, ruled on September 14 that under the provisions of the Stored Communications Act (SCA), government agencies may compel communication services such as cellphone or computer services to provide consumer information, but only under controlled conditions, which may include warrants or court order.

If Anwar al-Awlaki gets his way, the last sound cartoonist Molly Morris will hear is the swish of a scimitar. Or, more likely, a bomb blast.

Not surprisingly, it was the Nestor of the Founding Generation who made the most lasting and dramatic impact on the final day of the Constitutional Convention of 1787. Benjamin Franklin, hobbled by gout, was the central player in three scenes of the final act of this history-changing event.

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