One of the defining aspects of the Tea Party’s victories on Election Day was a renewed call for decreased government control over all aspects of Americans' lives: what they eat, how theiy spend and save money, and what technologies they can use in the service of commerce and a more modern, pleasurable lifestyle. While one of the hallmarks of the progressive agenda is to strengthen the regulatory arm of government by imposing its reach on all aspects of citizens' everyday lives, under such euphemistic banners as “net neutrality,” “public health,” and “sustainable development,” constitutionalists understand the fundamental truth that these are mere sublimated efforts to extend the regulatory reach of the progressive state into all aspects of everyday life.

In response to the latest energy-related crisis to affect the lives of the American people, the Obama administration, in conjunction with House Democrats, has announced its latest proposal to deal with rising oil prices: opening up the nation’s federal oil reserve supplies. Opening reserves rather than increasing domestic oil production, however, would further exacerbate the energy crisis being primarily driven by increased global demand.

President Obama�s former chief of staff, and newly-elected Mayor of Chicago, Rahm Emanuel once said, �You never want to let a good crisis go to waste.� Fortunately for President Obama, he has a number of crises from which to choose, and is being urged by his critics to take charge.

President Obama has set his sights on yet another endeavor that will continue to perpetuate government overreach: an overhaul of President Bush's "No Child Left Behind" education policy. According to the President, "The goals of No Child Left Behind were the right goals. Making a promise to educate every child with an excellent teacher-that's the right thing to do, that's the right goal."

According to the Salt Lake Tribune, March 8, a bill requiring Utah schools to teach that the United States is a republic and not a democracy, is being sent to the governor for his signature, after being passed in both houses of the state legislature.