Pledge to America"These days one of America's two great political parties routinely makes nonsensical promises," writes Paul Krugman in his Sept. 23 New York Times column. To which party is Krugman referring: the one promising that a gigantic federal bureaucracy and a massive number of new mandates on health insurance companies will improve the quality and reduce the cost of healthcare, or the one promising to rein in government spending even though the last President and Congress from its party made Lyndon Johnson look like Ebenezer Scrooge?

On Sunday more than 100 preachers will be speaking out on political issues and candidates in direct contravention of the IRS. And then each preacher will send a recording of their sermon to the IRS, challenging them to enforce the law. For the third year in a row, the last Sunday in September has witnessed a growing number of churches and their preachers directly confronting the IRS and daring the agency to come after them.

Christopher Coates used to be the voting chief for the Civil Rights Division of the United States Department of Justice. On Friday, September 24, he gave testimony under oath before the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights about the attitude of the Department of Justice toward civil rights violations against white Americans.

Southern New Jersey’s Courier-Post newspaper reported on September 21 that the state Senate had failed by a four-vote margin the previous day to override Governor Chris Christie’s veto of a $7.5 million appropriation for so-called family planning clinics. The report noted that seven Republicans who had backed the bill in June changed their positions and voted against it.

President Barack Obama has asserted that tax cuts are a priority, However, once it became clear that Senate Democrats could not come to a consensus on on preserving former President Bush�s tax cuts, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid decided to delay the vote until after the midterm elections in November.