Despite the mainstream media’s intentional disregard of Rep. Ron Paul as a top-tier Republican presidential candidate, widespread evidence of his popularity is apparent. On Saturday, the Texas Congressman won a landslide victory in the California Republican Party straw poll, a feat which continues to be ignored by the media. Likewise, military donation receipts for Republican candidates for the second quarter of this year reveal that Paul has received twice as much money from military members as all other GOP presidential candidates combined.

Homosexual activists have launched a petition drive aimed at forcing PayPal, an online e-commerce business, to stop handling donations made to a group of organizations that promote traditional family values, and which are battling the "gay" agenda. The group All Out is demanding that PayPal immediately suspend the online accounts of 10 mostly Christian organizations it calls �anti-LGBT extremist groups.� LGBT, an acronym for �Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender,� is one of the most recent labels aggressive homosexuals have coined to describe their �community.�

Next to President Barack Obama, probably the last person in Washington who expected a challenger in the 2012 primary election was House Speaker John Boehner. The Ohio Republican, one of the most powerful politicians in the country, won a three-way primary race in 2010 with 85 percent of the vote. Who in his right mind would try to take him on?

After spending hundreds of billions to bail them out, the federal government is now turning on the big banks it once protected. Earlier this month, the Federal Housing Finance Agency launched a broad legal assault on 17 major banks, claiming the banks misled Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac in misrepresenting the quality of mortgage-backed securities. The FHFA�s lawsuit is a new attempt on the part of the federal government to recoup from big banks some of the taxpayer money lost during the financial crisis. Banks named in the action include Bank of America, J.P. Morgan Chase, Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, Citigroup, and Deutsche Bank.

Ron PaulAmerica got a perfect exposition of the great progressivist myth in the September 12 CNN/Tea Party Presidential debate. The great progressivist myth is this: If government doesn't do it, then it won't happen. If the government doesn't do it, it doesn't count. If a person is against government intervening, he therefore must favor the ends the liberal or progressive claims will happen without government intervention. In short, the great progressivist myth is that you either favor government intervention, or you are an awful person who wants some horrible consequence.