Every once in a while, America's establishment columnists treat their readers to a surprisingly helpful bit of writing. Such was the case with George Will's January 16 column for Washington Post.

Viktor Bout, 44, a former Soviet/Russian military officer and current black market arms dealer with ties to Russian military intelligence — the GRU, was apprehended by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and Thai law enforcement officials in March 2008. Following two years of deliberations in Thai courts and much to the protest of the Russian government, Bout was extradited last November to the United States to face trial at the Southern District Court of New York, which is set to commence with a hearing on Friday, January 21.

Back in 2005 Congress passed a law, which President George W. Bush then signed, forcing sellers of products containing the decongestant pseudoephedrine to store such medicines behind the counter and dole them out to customers, logging each purchase to ensure that no one buys more than the feds’ arbitrarily-set limits on these drugs. The idea was to prevent people from purchasing large quantities of the medications and turning them into methamphetamines.

When Rep. Doug Lamborn (R-Colo.) introduced a bill in the 111th Congress to defund National Public Radio (NPR), two things were working against him: the overwhelming collectivist mindset of that Congress itself, and the fact that NPR hadn’t yet embarrassed itself sufficiently to build public opinion against the agency. In light of NPR’s series of gaffes since then, as well as the more conservative tone of the new 112th Congress, Lamborn has decided to try again.  

gavelWhen the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear oral arguments on a Fourth Amendment case decided by the Kentucky Supreme Court (Kentucky v. King), alarm bells went off. Under the Fourth Amendment, as readers are no doubt aware, “the right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”