Michele Bachmann�s high-profile entrance into the 2012 presidential race has been a boon to a media with a short attention span for issues pertinent to statecraft. Largely ignoring any actual qualifications the Minnesota congresswoman might have to abandon her position in the nation�s most important governing body and serve instead as President, news reporters, �journalists,� and political commentators have, instead, fixated over the past few weeks on where Bachmann attends church, what medications she may or may not be taking for a �medical condition,� and her husband�s education and career

As if the healthcare law was not controversial enough, enter free contraceptives. The Institute of Medicine recommends that insurance companies provide free contraceptives to all women, and the Department of Health and Human Services appears to be receptive to the idea.

Seen any walnuts in your medicine cabinet lately? According to the Food and Drug Administration, that is precisely where you should find them. Because Diamond Foods made truthful claims about the health benefits of consuming walnuts that the FDA didn’t approve, it sent the company a letter declaring, “Your walnut products are drugs” — and “new drugs” at that — and, therefore, “they may not legally be marketed … in the United States without an approved new drug application.” The agency even threatened Diamond with “seizure” if it failed to comply.

Those raised overseas can testify as to how comforting it is to be able to go on American military installations and eat pizza at Pizza Hut or eat a burger at Burger King. While the Pentagon has certainly done a good job taking care of its troops' gastronomical needs, many feel it has done a very poor job of taking care of their fundamental right to vote.

Now that the Minnesota state government shutdown has ended, details of the compromise between Governor Mark Dayton and the Republicans are now public -- and no one is happy.

At issue was the $5-billion shortfall between revenues and spending. Liberal Governor Mark Dayton had his own plan for bringing in more revenue: "I believe the wealthiest Minnesotans can afford to pay more taxes," he commented. Conservative Republicans in the state House and Senate, including House Speaker Kurt Zellers and Senate Majority Leader Amy Koch, dug in their heels on any tax increase whatsoever. In the end, both sides lost.