Under the guise of a “driveway fee,” the city council of Mission, Kansas, a suburb of Kansas City, has imposed a tax on churches based on the numbers that attend worship services. The fee, which is also being charged to non-profit organizations and charities in the community, is similar to a driveway tax that has been struck down as illegal in two other states, according to the Alliance Defense Fund, which filed a lawsuit on behalf of two congregations in the community.

The federal judiciary has had a chip on its shoulder ever since Alexander Hamilton described it as the “weakest of the three departments of power.” From Marbury v. Madison and McCulloch v. Maryland through to its present day progeny, federal judges consistently misinterpret the Constitution and misinterpret the powers assigned to them therein. In fact, for decades the district courts, courts of appeal, and the Supreme Court have gone out of their way to show that they can obliterate the Constitution just as powerfully as their sister branches.

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission took a big step forward toward legislating government regulation of the Internet Tuesday with a bureaucratic vote in favor of so-called “net neutrality” rules, despite the past rejection of such measures by Congress and the courts, not to mention the prohibition on government meddling in speech and the press listed in the First Amendment to the Constitution.

Moments ago, the United States Senate voted 71-26 to approve ratification of the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty, also known as New START. The treaty replaces an expired START that limits the number of nuclear weapons that may be maintained by Russia and the United States, and implements a joint system for verification.

Did you know that in 2010 the federal government spent $2.9 million for a study of the video game "World of Warcraft"? How about $1.8 million for a neon sign museum in Las Vegas? Or $823,000 for teaching South African men how to wash their private parts?