While more and more lawmakers seem to be coming to terms with the dire straits of the American economy and the impossibilities of sustaining the deficit, few seem prepared to do what is necessary to resolve the problems.

James O'Keefe, the young conservative journalist who brought down ACORN in a series a secretly recorded videos, has done it again. This time, he bamboozled two top executives of National Public Radio into having lunch with members of a fictive Muslim educational organization supposedly founded by a member of the Muslim Brotherhood.

georgia voter idOn March 7, by a 6-1 vote, the Supreme Court of Georgia upheld that state’s law requiring voters to provide government-issued photo identification in order to exercise the franchise.

As has been well chronicled in The New American and elsewhere, over a dozen states (16 at least) have recently proposed bills seeking to defend their constitutionally protected sovereignty. In fact, five of those states have enacted such laws. 

Approximately 1.3 million residents of Illinois hold state-issued Firearm Owner Identification (FOID) cards, and if the current plan of Attorney General Lisa Madigan comes to pass, their names will become part of the public record. Madigan’s decision comes in response to a public records request by the Associated Press; the AP claims “that the list of FOID cardholders is public record and must be disclosed. The permit holders' addresses and telephone numbers would remain private.” But such an attempt to dismiss privacy concerns is easily negated by the ease with which a host of Internet search engines — and an artifact of 20th century technology called the “phone book” — could easily allow criminals to reconnect those permit holders’ names to their addresses and phone numbers.