Scott Bradley aims to give Utah voters a real choice in the November U.S. Senate race. The longtime Republican-turned-Constitution Party candidate faces an uphill battle in the race, but is running on a pure constitutionalist platform.

In the taxonomy of politics circa 2010, the Tea Party is typically classified as the party of the Constitution. Newspapers nationwide have chronicled the conservative diaspora from the GOP to the Tea Party. Proponents of small government and those anxious for a return to constitutional principles rejoice at the rise of an alternative to the big government, spend-happy, interventionist, two-headed hound that for decades has skulked along the Potomac River, guarding the entrance to the halls of government.

In a private meeting that took place last week, Nevada's Republican senatorial candidate Sharron Angle was recorded urging third-party candidate Scott Ashjian to drop out of the race, as well as condemning the Republican Party for its failure to adhere to its original principles.

San Francisco is considering a new city ordinance that would prohibit McDonald’s from putting a toy in its Happy Meal boxes unless it also included fruit and vegetables and reduced the calories of the Happy Meal. This proposal is just one of several recent efforts by San Francisco to restrict the freedom of its citizens so that they are healthier. The city has banned the sale of sweetened soda drinks from vending machines on city property and banned the sale of tobacco from groceries.

Despite the best efforts of gun-control organizations, Americans are gaining more and more freedom to keep and bear arms. Forty-eight states now have laws allowing citizens to carry concealed weapons, and nearly that number have laws allowing open carry of guns as well. Many of these states place certain restrictions on both types of carrying, often requiring gun toters to obtain a permit, but the progress toward more firearms freedom is clearly gaining momentum.