On Wednesday, April 28, in a surprising 5-4 ruling by the United States Supreme Court, justices ruled that the 1st Amendment “accommodates” for religious displays on public land.  In reference to the display of a cross in the Mojave Desert honoring the lives of fallen soldiers, a divided court ruled that the Constitution “does not require the eradication of all religious symbols in the public realm.” 

In the days that have followed the enactment by Arizona Governor Jan Brewer of the Support Our Law Enforcement and Safe Neighborhoods Act, repercussions have sounded throughout the nation and the world. Legislators and larks have decried the decision by the people of the Grand Canyon State and their elected representatives to proactively enforce existing federal immigration laws, thus beginning the burdensome process of retarding the unlawful invasion of the United States from across the porous southern border. Lawsuits and lamentations dog the new law set to go into effect by the first of August.

Chelene Nightingale is no stranger to politics. For the past five years, Chelene has been a leading constitutional activist, organizing many rallies and marches in California, including the "Free the Texas Three" march for Deputy Gilmer Hernandez and Border Patrol Agents Ignacio Ramos and Jose Compean in Hollywood.

Prosecutorial misconduct is becoming uncomfortably familiar to Americans. The Duke Lacrosse Lynching, for example, showed how easily politicized justice or “social justice” can become injustice. As laws increasingly tend to focus on conduct which is politically incorrect, like hate crimes laws, the decision to prosecute or not likewise becomes less connected to justice and more connected to politics.

Living in New York has long cost an arm and a leg. Now dying there may cost a kidney and a heart. Under a proposed law, all state residents would automatically be enrolled as organ donors — without their consent.

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