CongressThe Senate today voted 65-31 in favor of repealing the 17-year-old military policy, “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” (DADT). The historic bill is now on its way to President Obama’s desk, where it will be signed into law.

atomic bombAlmost three decades have passed since the film The Atomic Cafe (1982) offered a cynical, and yet vacuous, denigration of the efforts of American civil-defense experts to prepare the populace for the horrific possibility of nuclear war — and other, more malicious, efforts were also at work to undermine the will of the West to continue the Cold War. As a newly inaugurated President Reagan prepared the American people to begin to more actively counter Soviet aggression, Soviet front groups promoted their agenda through a sham "peace" movement, led by the World Peace Council. A generation of citizens has grown up having been propagandized into the belief that any use of “The Bomb” would mean the end of the world. In the words of Prof. T.J. Nelson’s “Duck and Cover” essay at entropy.brneurosci.org:

gavelA Florida federal judge hinted on Thursday at the possibility of becoming the second judge to strike down the individual mandate provision of the healthcare law, asserting that it would be a “giant leap” for the Supreme Court to rule in its favor.

quietOn Wednesday, December 15, the House of Representatives voted 250 to 175 to repeal the military’s long-standing policy of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.” The legislation now awaits a vote in the Senate, where support is allegedly gaining momentum.

Army birtherOn Thursday, an army doctor who disobeyed deployment orders because he questioned President Obama’s eligibility to serve as Commander in Chief was sentenced to six months in military prison and dismissal from the Army.