An article in the Washington Post today relates how Supreme Court justices are spending the early days of the latest session parsing the language of various statutes to determine the merits of the constitutional questions arising from them. One day, says Robert Barnes, author of the piece, the definition of “file” is debated; the next day it’s “unavoidable” that must be defined in constitutional context. Later in the week, the justices pepper counsel with questions over the interplay between verb and adverb in the phrase “necessarily implies.” On that point, Chief Justice John G. Roberts laments, “…the adverb points one way and the verb points another.”

In the Houston, Texas area, a group of volunteer citizens called True The Vote, headed by Catherine Engelbrecht, has uncovered what appears to be vote fraud on an enormous scale. This scandal, if it spreads nationally, has the potential to be the biggest scandal in American elections in decades.

The Tea Party clearly has the establishment in a panic. The latest evidence: "America's Holy Writ," a Newsweek article by Andrew Romano on the Tea Party’s supposedly confused approach to the Constitution.

U-2 aircraftAmericans do not like to think of their government as an aggressor against foreign countries. We prefer to believe that our country is always the victim of unprovoked attacks and that military actions our government takes against other countries are always in response to such unwarranted aggression. For this reason, Presidents have generally felt it necessary to provoke attacks secretly, knowing that once the country was attacked, seemingly with no cause, Americans would rally ‘round the flag and support the war the President had wanted all along.

chelationThe Food and Drug Administration, in its role as enforcer of politically-acceptable medical practice, has just “sent warning letters to several companies notifying them that the substances they sell without a prescription for a procedure known as ‘chelation’ are ‘unapproved drugs and devices,’ which makes them illegal,” according to a report in the Washington Post. Chelation therapy is a well-established treatment for patients who have been exposed to high levels of heavy metals such as lead; there are even FDA-approved prescription-only products for administering the treatment. However, as the Post points out, “the companies that received the warning letters sell products without a prescription, often as ‘dietary supplements,’ and describe multiple health benefits, none of which have been proven, the agency said.”