U.S. News

Tom TancredoTea Party activists are working nationwide to shake every tree of unrest wherever they find them growing to acquire money sufficient to fund campaigns of viable political candidates who are willing to vow to hew tightly to the conservative principles upon which the movement is built. While these support safaris are happening in several states, the battle for the state house in Colorado has particularly animated the substantial segment of the population dissatisfied with the policies of the current Democratic governor, Bill Ritter.

Three controversial provisions of the Patriot Act are set to expire this New Year’s Eve. They granted the federal government wide-ranging powers of surveillance and seizure with few limitations.

health careOn November 30, the U.S. Senate began debating legislation that would change America’s healthcare system by giving government even greater control. The increased role for government is being posited as necessary to provide healthcare to millions of uninsured Americans.

President Obama instructed Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) to deliver to his desk a comprehensive overhaul of the healthcare system in America and make it happen for under $900 million. No sooner had the roll been called in the Senate chamber and the requisite 60 votes counted, Senator Reid was crowing about how his package came in under the budget set by the president. At the unveiling of his legislation, Reid was quick to point to the bill’s bottom line: $849 billion. That gives the President about $51 million in change.

Justifiably, much is being made in the press of FBI, Department of Homeland Security, and Pentagon investigators’ inscrutable failure to take any sort of appropriate action that may have prevented Major Nidal Hasan’s shooting spree of November 5 — when he shot 13 people to death and wounded more than 30 others at his duty station of Fort Hood, Texas.

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