Last week the Pentagon released the report of its investigation into the Fort Hood shootings. The review runs about 90 pages and remarkably doesn’t once, not once, mention Major Nidal Hasan (the shooter) or Islam (the reputed impetus for the killings).

As reported by The New American on January 11, a man, at the time unidentified, attempted to gain access to the well-guarded hospital room where Major Nidal Hasan is recovering from wounds he suffered when police shot him, ending his deadly rampage of November 5, 2009 at Ft. Hood, Texas, where 13 people lost their lives. The would-be intruder has now been identified, and federal agents are telling his story.

In a January 26 report, the New York Times revealed newly obtained additional details from transcripts of diplomatic cables sent by U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan Karl W. Eikenberry to his superiors last November, in which he warned about the inadequacies of Afghan President Hamid Karzai and took a position against the U.S. troop buildup favored by Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal, the commander of U.S. and NATO forces in Afghanistan.

According to ABC News, President Obama will be changing the “tone” of his upcoming State of the Union address Wednesday evening. This change allegedly reflects the impact the Brown win in Massachusetts last week had on politics in general, but also that it had not been anticipated by Obama or the Democrats.

Many Democrats broke with their morning routine last Wednesday and skipped reading the morning paper. The headlines were full of the report of their party’s demise and not even Colombia could produce a coffee strong enough to rouse them from the droopiness of defeat. There wasn’t a paper in the country that didn’t document (in the largest possible font size) the demise of the Democratic Party thanks to the victory of Scott Brown in the special election to fill the seat of the late Senator Edward Kennedy of Massachusetts.