healthcare reformWhen French economist and legislator Frederic Bastiat accused “disseminators of subversive doctrines” of “concocting the antidote and the poison in the same laboratory,” he might — were he alive to see the follies of our day — have American healthcare in mind.

The state of Alabama offers driver's license tests in Japanese, Korean, German, Arabic, Chinese, Farsi, French, Greek, Russian, Spanish, Thai, and Vietnamese. And English. Tim James, a Republican candidate for Governor, says that's 12 languages too many.

The United States’ unemployment rate remains high at 9.7 percent. States are in the unfair position of having to take immigration law into their own hands. Americans are angry about the overspending in D.C., increased taxes, an aggressive health care bill, and proposals for “cap and trade.” But despite all of these looming issues, what legislation does Congress plan to tackle today, April 29? H.R. 2499 (Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2009), a piece of legislation that may allow Puerto Rico to become a state.

The Board of Supervisors in Santa Clara County, California, voted 3-2 on April 25 to ban restaurants in unincorporated areas of the county from giving away toys with children's meals that exceed set levels of calories, fat, salt, and sugar.

DOctors & PatientsThe Obama administration finally finagled reticent Democrats into passing “healthcare reform,” despite the fact that a majority of Americans were against the Democrats’ bill. And the Democratic Party, as a whole, will likely face retribution by the public during elections in November, but the retaliation will probably not be for the reasons you might think.