Rand PaulU.S. Senate candidate Rand Paul of Kentucky said he supports the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and would “unequivocally” oppose any effort to repeal it. The Republican nominee issued his statement after a news cycle dominated to a large extent by close questioning about his previous statements on the subject and whether he believed the principle of property rights should allow the owner of a business establishment to refuse service to racial minorities.

Zev Chafets, writing an op-ed for the New York Times, concluded that radio show host Rush Limbaugh “is the brains and the spirit behind [the conservative] resurgence.”

Obama’s connections to less than reputable characters and groups like Goldman Sachs, the Chicago Climate Exchange, “Fannie and Freddie,” former Chicago Governor Rod Blagojevich, Franklin Raines, Bill Ayers, Van Jones, Reverend Jeremiah Wright, etc. (the list appears infinite) have placed Americans in the unfortunate position of having to question everything that the government says and does. This epiphany has forced the Central Illinois 9/12 project to investigate the suspiciously preferable treatment Obama and his cohorts have provided to the Chicago-based, community-based investment bank, Shorebank.

The new fourth revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) published by the American Psychiatric Association may define several new psychiatric disorders. Some of these do not sound like varieties of mental illness at all, but rather opinions and attitudes. What would “oppositional defiant disorder,” for example, represent?

The day after he won the Republican primary for U.S. Senate in Kentucky, it was clear that one of the issues political newcomer Rand Paul will have to confront in the general election campaign is his beliefs about a federal law enacted 46 years ago and rarely debated in more recent decades. The law is the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the issue that has been raised anew is its ban on discrimination in public accommodations.