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Egypt’s deposed president, Hosni Mubarak (left), will be facing trial on charges of corruption and murder. The news is just one more plaguing issue for the former dictator, who has reportedly been suffering from health problems since he was stripped of his power months ago.

According to Egypt’s top prosecutor, Mubarak is responsible for the murder of unarmed protesters during Egypt’s notorious protests that ultimately resulted in the usurpation of Mubarak’s power. During the 18-day revolt, approximately 850 people died, many from police bullets.

Recent developments in Egyptian politics are revealing that not only Islamic militants are gaining power in the new regime: Communists are also preparing for a more active role in the new Egypt.

According to Links — International Journal of Socialist Renewal, five self-identified "Communist" and "Socialist" parties in Egypt recently merged into a united front, and are becoming increasingly bold. Links author Mohamed El Hebeishy explains:

Islamic atrocities continue to be perpetrated against the Egyptian Christians, but the Western media often misreport such crimes as if they were the result of “communal clashes.”

One of the most recent incidents in the persecution of the churches of Egypt was the attack on churches in Imbaba, a suburb of Cairo. According to an Agenzia Fides news article, the violence was allegedly perpetrated by members of the Salafi movement ("Salafi" meaning "following the forefathers of Islam"), and involved attacks on Roman Catholic and Coptic churches:

Following a decade-long trial, an international court sentenced Rwandan Maj. Gen. Augustin Bizimungu (left) to 30 years in prison for his alleged role in the 1994 genocide that left more than 500,000 ethnic Tutsis dead. Two other former military officers received 20-year sentences each.  

It looks like Ron Paul and Steve Forbes aren't the only ones talking about the gold standard for what Paul has called an "honest currency" that won't be made worthless by inflation. The central bank of Zimbabwe, where hyperinflation is not a stranger, is considering adopting a gold-backed currency according to a recent report in the New Zimbabwe.

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